The Christian Studies Blog


Philosophy of Religion

Posted by Dr. Keith Stanglin on March 8, 2018 at 9:43 AM

Aristotle began his Metaphysics with the observation that people first began to philosophize out of wonder or marveling (thaumazein). 

On those rare occasions that we late modern folks find an opportunity to contemplate things away from the noise, screens, and other distractions, we, too, might experience that same ineffable sense of wonder that motivated the ancient philosophers.  We may find that the universe presents itself to us as a question.  Even when we are confident about its answer (namely, God), the solution itself may raise other questions or puzzles.

Although questions of these sorts can be addressed in any theological discipline, the discipline of philosophy of religion  is especially suited for such questions.  

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Topics: About Austin Grad, Philosophy of Religion

New Summer Course - Don't Miss Out!

Posted by Dawn Bond on March 7, 2018 at 1:13 PM

You won't want to miss this exciting new course

with Dr. Jim Reynolds!

Pastoring in an Age of Spiritual Anarchy

July 16-20, 23-27, 6pm-9:40pm

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Topics: Discipleship

How Bad Was Martin Luther?

Posted by Dr. Keith Stanglin on February 27, 2018 at 11:18 AM

In my Church History (late medieval to modern) lectures this semester, I recently finished the unit on Martin Luther and the beginnings of the Protestant Reformation.  While teaching about Luther, I was reminded of the many commemorations that took place last year on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of the 95 Theses (October 31, 1517).  It seems that nearly everyone interested in church history, including yours truly, was obliged to comment on the legacy of Luther and the Reformation. 

One of the overarching themes in many of the contributions, Roman Catholic and Protestant alike, was the tragedy of the schism, which was also my point of departure in a previous blog post.  Not surprisingly, the assessments of Luther were varied across the range of bloggers and columnists.  What did surprise me, however, was how unjustly dismissive and even contemptuous some writers were toward Luther.

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Topics: Reformation Day, Protestant, Scatological, Martin Luther

Not in Vain

Posted by Dr. Todd Hall on February 22, 2018 at 1:03 PM

What’s in a name? Well, it turns out that the answer to that question is “a whole lot.” Names can be venerated and names can be tarnished. They can follow someone around, and they can come to symbolize character and personality. Names matter. Especially the Name of God.

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Topics: 10 Commandments, 10 Words, God's Name, Blasphemy

No Other Gods

Posted by Dr. Keith Stanglin on February 10, 2018 at 12:44 PM

As Dr. Peterson mentioned last week, we will be working through the 10 Commandments, or 10 Words, this semester in chapel.  He introduced the topic last week, and it is now my task to begin with the first commandment.  The initial challenge we face, though, is where exactly the first commandment or word starts and ends.  You may have noticed this already, but they are not numbered for us.  Later in Exodus and Deuteronomy, the writers refer back to these “10 Words” or Decalogue (Ex. 34:28; Deut. 4:13; 10:4), but they don’t enumerate them for us.  Depending on which of at least three different numbering systems you choose, you could come up with 13 words.  But, since the text says there are ten, and “Triskaidecalogue” just doesn’t sound right anyway, we’ll stick with ten.  But, again, which ten?  And what are the parameters of the first?

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Topics: 10 Commandments, 10 Words, Other gods

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